Raising children in the social media limelight? Pause before you post – 10 minute mail

How (over)sharing your children’s triumphs and antics with the world may impact their immediate and distant future – and how to reduce the risks of ‘sharenting’

Most people like to share glimpses of their personal lives on social media, ranging from sports activities and delicious food to achievements and special moments. These are usually shared with their network of family, friends, and sometimes followers. The usual reason is strengthening bonds, since your family and friendship circle can be dispersed all around the globe.

Those who are also parents often post photos of their children from a very early age, sometimes even in the form of ultrasounds. Strictly speaking, their children have a digital presence before they’re even born. And the sharing doesn’t stop there: teething, first steps, potty training, and a wide assortment of other achievements that some parents like to share well into their children’s teenage years.

The phenomenon of (over)sharing content involving one’s kids on social media has even earned its own name – sharenting. It’s all right to feel the need to document your children growing up, but it’s not OK to share their every waking moment on social media for everyone to see. Here are some reasons why.

Ultimately, it’s not your information

Although most parents obviously have the best interests of their children at heart, they also tend to be the biggest violators of their children’s privacy. According to a recent report from the Children’s Commissioner of England, parents post an average 1,300 photos and videos of their children by the age of 13. While parents share various aspects of their children’s lives with the best intentions, they should thoroughly think about what impact the sharing of this information could have for their children in the future. As their progeny grow up, some of the photos and details they have shared may have far-reaching consequences, which they are unaware of at the moment.

For example, parents may share pictures of their kids sporting T-shirts showing support for a political party or cause, with which their children might not want to be affiliated or even agree with when they grow up. Furthermore, it could prove difficult for them to shed the reputation their parents may have unintentionally cultivated for them by inappropriate sharenting.

While sharing the images of children is at the discretion of the parents when they are too young to understand or care, there comes a point where you have to have a discussion on posting about them on social media. You should make a set of rules on what content is acceptable and respect their opinions on the matter, including in what actually gets posted.

If you think the idea is novel, you’d be mistaken. Gwyneth Paltrow was called out by her daughter Apple Martin for not asking for her consent when the actress shared a mom-daughter photo. “Mom we have discussed this. You may not post anything without my consent,” wrote Apple, who was 14 at the time.

What am I sharing? And with whom?

Data on the internet is, by design, usually searchable, shareable, and long-lasting. Or in other words “what goes on the internet, usually stays there”. An important tidbit of internet etiquette that is frequently repeated is that you should think twice about what you’re sharing, something that should apply tenfold if you’re sharing someone else’s information, like your child’s.

Nonetheless, people tend to forget that something as banal as sharing a public photo of a child’s birthday party could cause a lot of harm if the photo made its way into the wrong hands. Let’s break down how much information one such post can include. At the very least, it could include:

  • a photo of the child, probably with a wish along the lines of “Happy 2nd birthday, John!”,
  • details that may reveal the location, such as landmarks,
  • other people, since it may be a group photo; this may be problematic too, as you need to be mindful of other people’s privacy,
  • a geotag if the parent hasn’t turned off location tracking.

Piecing the information together, we have the child’s name, birth date, and address. This information could be then used, for example, for identity theft and fraud.

Stacey Steinberg, associate director for the Center on Children and Families, also touched upon the perils of sharenting in her paper, Sharenting: Children’s privacy in the age of social media. One of the examples mentioned is of a mother who posted pictures of her twins’ toilet training. She later found out that strangers accessed these pictures, downloaded and altered them, and then shared those on a website used by pedophiles.

RELATED READING: Online grooming: A threat to minors that demands our attention

This and other of Steinberg’s examples demonstrate that people are sometimes woefully unaware of how easy it is for other people to download and store images shared on social media, or of how much information they contain. Which brings us to another question – who are you sharing these photos with?

The audience of your posts depends on where and with whom you choose to share them. If your social media profile is public, then literally anyone who stumbles upon your profile can see the content. However, if you keep it private, only those you have “friended” or allowed to follow you can see it. How many of them do you really know? When was the last time you conducted an audit of your friend or follower list?

Facebook, for example, allows you to choose an audience for each of your posts, so you can restrict them to specific family members and selected friends. But that presents its own set of problems. Can you trust them not to repost it? Do you believe that they adhere to proper cybersecurity and privacy practices and have everything locked down tighter than Fort Knox? These are questions parents probably don’t really ask themselves all that often when posting something, although they should.

How to be a responsible “sharent”?

The best and safest advice is, “don’t post anything relating to your children on social media”, but most modern parents would be hard-pressed to comply. Flicking through physical photo albums is from a bygone era and hauling them around to share with family and friends is a tad impractical. However, there are ways to share photos that mitigate the risks we outlined earlier.

  • Don’t share anything that may contain any type of personal details or information that could help identify your child: full names, addresses, birth dates.
  • Turn off location tracking when taking photos so they don’t get geotagged.
  • Be specific about how you share the photos; take a look at your privacy filters first and the audience of the post before sharing on social media.
  • Share photos and information with people you really know and trust and ask them to not share them further.
  • Before posting anything, take a step back and consider how what you’re planning to share is going to reflect on your kid in the future.

Everybody understands the need of recording memories and sharing them with those close to you, but you need to do it in a safer and responsible way. Hopefully, this article shed some light on the risks associated with over sharenting and the impact it may have on your children’s future. Your kids will eventually join social media, so you can start by leading by example. That way, they’ll have a stable foundation before you start a conversation with your children about the perils of social media.

To learn more about more dangers faced by children online as well as about how not only technology can help, head over to Safer Kids Online.



Amer Owaida


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Google Photos Stops Backing Up Social Media Folders By Default

Google Photos has stopped backing up images and videos from folders created by social media and messaging apps like WhatsApp, Messages, and TikTok (via Android Police).

Previously, Google’s photo app would automatically upload all media saved to an iOS device, including any files saved in folders originating from social and messaging apps.

Google says it’s now turning off this aspect of its cloud photo backup service “to save internet resources” as people share more photos and videos amid the ongoing global health crisis.

Users can reverse this change and re-enable backup of photos and video from social media and messaging apps by following these instructions.

Other digital services including YouTube and Disney+ adopted similar measures to reduce bandwidth strain caused by the global health crisis several months ago.

Tag: Google Photos

This article, “Google Photos Stops Backing Up Social Media Folders By Default” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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3 things to discuss with your kids before they join social media – 10 minute mail

What are some of the key things your children should know about before they make their first foray into social media?

Since technology has permeated every facet of life, social media has become a daily part of it. Adults are not the only ones flocking to social sites; an increasing number of children are too. Children actually do have their own social networks they can start their journey on; those are usually marketed as moderated safe havens, where children can interact, while parents have a degree of oversight of their activities. Even Facebook has introduced a kid’s version of its messenger app.

However, these are moderated, curated, and safe spaces that children eventually leave when they reach a certain age. So, what can you do, to make your children’s transition to more adult-centric social networks as safe and smooth as possible? As we mark the International Children’s Day and the Global Day of Parents, let’s take a look at some of the discussions you should have with your children prior to them joining Facebook, Instagram, TikTok or others social networking sites.

Are you sure you want to share that?

What goes on the internet stays on the internet; a mantra almost as old as the internet itself. Something most adults tend to forget, although it should be reiterated every time they consider sharing anything on the internet. The same mantra should be emphasized to children who are going to join social networks geared toward adults.

If they want to post or share something, they should always think about how it would reflect on them in the future. Although it may prove to be a difficult task to discuss such a topic with teenagers, it’s nevertheless important. A good rule of thumb before posting anything would be for them to ask themselves what an older relative (a grandparent for example) would say, if they saw the content.

RELATED READING: At what age should kids be able to access online services?

Perhaps another teaching moment could be to point out how a youthful indiscretion could come back to haunt them, or invalidate their career choices or even university applications in the future. Unfortunately, there are myriad examples of how tweets, forum posts and even yearbook photos and comments have come back to haunt entertainers, sports figures, and public officials alike.

Do you really know that person?

“Don’t talk to strangers” is perhaps one of the most repeated sentences a child hears growing up. The point is hammered home not just by parents, but teachers, public service announcements, kid’s shows, and the list goes on. So, while most teens may consider that social networks are safer since it’s online and “it doesn’t count”, parents should clearly communicate that the risks are the same and, in some cases, may even prove to be worse.

Unfortunately, you can illustrate the risks using countless examples of horror stories involving teenagers who were groomed online by child predators and eventually fell victim to them. Alternatively, there are multiple movies and TV series episodes dealing with the topic of interacting with strangers online, as one ancient proverb says: “it’s better to see something once than to hear about it a thousand times.” Black Mirror is one such show that deals with the dark side of technology and connected life, albeit in a more sci-fi mode.

Privacy settings

When adults sign up to a social network, they are rarely in a hurry to go through their privacy settings, so it can’t be expected of teenagers to be any more meticulous, even if they were born into a connected world. Another thing to keep in mind is that social networks continuously update their privacy and security settings to keep up with the increased scrutiny of the general public and governments alike. Therefore, instilling in teenagers a sense of responsibility about how their data is handled and viewed is very important.

To that end, some social networks started introducing tools that allow you to conduct reviews of your privacy. Facebook, for example, has the Privacy Checkup. This comprehensive tool allows you to look at your profile through the eyes of different types of viewers, ranging from friends to strangers, so you can more easily choose what you want to share and with whom. Another nifty option lets you audit who can see your past and future posts. You can read through our article on Facebook privacy settings to have a better grasp of what options you have to secure both your and your teen’s privacy.

Final thoughts

Raising a child in a more digitalized world can prove to be a challenge, especially since times have changed and a lot of the options and technologies weren’t around when you were growing up. On the other hand, it is important not to shy away from these challenges and to prepare your kids for the obstacles they will face in the digital world as well as in the real one, since they are deeply intertwined. By talking to your children about the risks and pitfalls of social media and how to handle them responsibly, you can prepare them better for adulthood and protect them – as well as rest easier – since they will be more vigilant online.

To learn more about more dangers faced by children online as well as about how not only technology can help, head over to Safer Kids Online.



Amer Owaida


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CBS Drama ‘All Rise’ Will Use FaceTime and Zoom to Film New Episode Amid Social Distancing

Many television shows and movies have paused filming at the current time as people practice social distancing, which has delayed new movies and television content. One CBS drama series, “All Rise,” has a unique solution, though, and plans to film in actors’ homes.


“All Rise” will use programs like FaceTime, WebEX, and Zoom, along with “other available social media and online technology,” according to TVLine. The episode, which will focus on current events, will feature footage recorded by each of the series regulars within their homes, with the judge virtually presiding over a bench trial in an episode that mirrors current events.

“It’s a unique chance for our All Rise family to band together – in our different homes, even cities – to tell a story about resilience, justice and the power of community,” executive producer Greg Spottiswood said in a statement.

Virtual footage will be shot in each of the series regular’s homes, with VFX added in post production to create the necessary backgrounds. A cinematographer operating solo from a vehicle will capture exterior footage representing “the desolate environment that currently exists on the streets and in the neighborhoods of Los Angeles.”

The episode is set to air on Monday, May 4, and if it goes well, we could see other TV studios adopting similar techniques using software and hardware from Apple and other technology companies to create content remotely.

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Apple Music Shares Playlists Aimed at Lifting Your Spirits While Social Distancing

Apple Music is now offering its subscribers a few playlists aimed at working from home, focusing on schoolwork, and generally lifting spirits for everyone during the current pandemic. These new “Come Together” playlists can be found on the Browse tab of ‌Apple Music‌ in the carousel up top.


Apple has made the following playlists: “Isolation Icebreakers,” “Work From Home Hustle,” “Virtual Hugs,” “High-School-Strumentals,” “Living Room Dance Party,” “Astral Escape,” and “Social Distancing Social Club.” Apple said that it built each of these playlists to suit a variety of situations and “to help provide comfort, motivation, focus – or just something to dance to and get your mind off all of this.”

The “Come Together” featured section also includes a few pre-existing playlists on ‌Apple Music‌. There’s an area for workout playlists, relaxing, family fun, popular “Essentials” playlists, revisiting old favorite albums, music videos, studying, acoustic music, unwinding, and catching up with some Beats 1 Radio shows.

The new section of ‌Apple Music‌ has launched a few days after Apple began rolling out the “Get Up! Mix” to users, which provides a weekly selection of uplifting and energetic songs. Last week, Apple also introduced a new way to alert users of album launches, with notifications placed directly within the Library tab of ‌Apple Music‌.

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Beware of Stalkerware That Has Eyes On All of Your Social Media! – Disposable mail news

Dear social media mongers, amidst all the talk about the Coronavirus and keeping your body’s health in check, your digital safety needs kicking up a notch too.

Because, pretty recently, security researchers discovered, what is being called as a “Stalkerware”, which stalks your activities over various social platforms like WhatsApp, Instagram, Gmail, Facebook, and others.

‘MonitorMinor’, per the sources, is definitely the most formidable one in its line.

Stalkerware are “monitoring software” or ‘Spyware’ that are employed either by people with serious trust issues or officials who need to spy for legitimate reasons.

Via this extremely creepy spyware kind, gathering information like the target’s ‘Geographical location’ and Messaging and call data is a cakewalk. Geo-fencing is another spent feature of it.

This particular stalkerware is hitting the headlines this hard because, MonitorMinor has the competence to spy on ‘Communication channels’, like most of our beloved messaging applications.

The discoverers of this stalkerware issued a report in which they mentioned that in a “clean” Android system, direct communication between applications is blocked by the “Sandbox” to kill the possibilities of the likes of this spyware gaining access to any social media platform’s data. This is because of the model called “Discretionary Access Control” (DAC).

Per sources, the author of the stalkerware in question manipulates the “SuperUser-type app” (SU utility) (if present) allowing them root-access to the system.

The presence of the SU utility makes all the difference for the worse. Because owing to it and its manipulation, MonitorMinor gains root access to the system.

The applications on the radar are BOTIM, Facebook, Gmail, Hangouts, Hike News & Content, Instagram, JusTalk, Kik, LINE, Skype, Snapchat, Viber, and Zalo-Video Call.

From lock patterns to passwords, MonitorMinor has the power to dig out files that exist in the system as ‘data’. And it obviously can use them to unlock devices. This happens to be the first stalkerware to be able to do so, mention sources.

Per reports, the procedure is such that the “persistence mechanism” as a result of the malware manipulates the root access. The stalkerware then reverts the system section to read/write from the initial read-only mode, copies itself on it, deletes itself from the user section, and conveniently goes back to read-only mode again.

Reports mention that even without the root access, MonitorMinor can do a consequential amount of harm to targets. It can control events in apps by manipulating the “Accessibility Services”. A “keylogger” is also effected via the API to permit forwarding of contents.
Unfortunately, victims can’t do much to eradicate the stalkerware form their systems, yet.

Other functions of the stalkerware include:
• Access to real-time videos from the device’s camera
• Access to the system log, contact lists, internal storage contents, browsing history of on Chrome, usage stats of particular apps
• Access to sound recordings from the device’s microphone
• Control over the device’s SMS commands.

The security researchers released a report by the contents of which, it was clear that the installation rate of it was the maximum in India, closely followed by Mexico and then Germany, Saudi Arabia, and the UK.

The researchers also per reports have reasons to believe that possibly the MonitorMinor might have been developed by an Indian because they allegedly found a ‘Gmail account with an Indian name’ in the body of MonitorMinor.


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The Russian quality system (Roskachestvo) gave recommendations on protecting data in social networks – Disposable mail news

Scammers in social networks use social engineering techniques to hack a user account. In this regard, Roskachestvo experts recommend setting the most stringent privacy settings for the personal page. According to experts, cybercriminals tend to get into the friend list in social networks in order to use this opportunity for fraud in the future, so users of social networks should monitor their privacy and be vigilant.

“Set the most strict privacy settings. For example, hide your contact information, published posts, and information about relatives and friends from everyone except your friends. This will make it more difficult for attackers to get your data and use it in fraud using social engineering,” said experts.

Cybercriminals use fake phone numbers, fake names, and other people’s photos to get into the friend’s list. In addition, there is a high risk that when you click on a postcard, petition, or unknown link, the user is redirected to a site that requests access data to social networks and passes them to the fraudster.

“Everyone knows for sure that a request for financial assistance from a hacked page is a fraudulent technique,” reminded Roskachestvo.

Experts advise adding only really familiar people to friends, and also beware of those who ask or offer money, and if a friend makes such a request, ask him personally by phone.

“Do not send payment or other confidential information in social networks and messengers. If you have already sent your card data, find and delete these messages,” said experts.

Roskachestvo advises not to follow suspicious links sent in messages, not to use public Wi-Fi networks, set up two-factor authentication in social networks, and use complex passwords for each service, using special software generators to compile them.

“At the same time, it is extremely important to use different passwords for accounts on different resources,” said Anton Kukanov, head of the Center for Digital Expertise of Roskachestvo.


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Clause Addition to the IT Act; Social Media Companies Now Responsible For All Nonuser Generated Content – Disposable mail news

A change brought in line with the changes in the US and Europe, the Indian government has recently added a clause to the proposed IT intermediary guidelines, making social media companies responsible for all nonuser produced content including supported content, distributed on their platforms. 

The change is expected to impact some extremely popular social media platforms, like Twitter, TikTok, YouTube, Instagram as well as Facebook. 

When the amended guidelines are made public, social media organizations will be required to accordingly and appropriately tag and identify all sponsored content published on their platforms and alongside it, draft standards, which are ‘under consideration’ of the law ministry, are expected to be notified in about a few weeks according to a senior government official “We have had a few rounds of discussions with the law ministry. 

These guidelines should be notified by February-end, the start of March.”

Section 79-II of the Information Technology Act, 2000, right now absolves online intermediaries from obligation for any third party substance shared on their platform. In any case, with the new clause, the Act will give “safe harbor protection” to intermediaries, inasmuch as they just assume the job of a facilitator and not maker or modifier, in any way of the content posted.

What expedited the change was an issue that occurred in the previous year a disagreement regarding content between social media platform TikTok and Twitter-sponsored ShareChat where the latter had to bring down more than 100 videos from its platform. 

Right now, platforms like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram have certain features and tags through which ads and paid partnerships are displayed. Yet, publicists and advertisers state brands would rather push content through influencers to make it look increasingly organic. 

There is likewise no compulsion or onus on the influencers to highlight that the products and content they are supporting are paid for. 

However, Government authorities said such content, produced by influencers without the contribution of the social media platforms, may in any case not be secured by the most recent clause. This clause will relate to just such non-user produced content in which the platform is in some way involved.


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Hackers blitz social media accounts of 15 NFL teams – 10 minute mail

The league and scores of teams were caught off-guard by the re-emergence of an infamous hacking group

Fifteen National Football League (NFL) teams, including this year’s Super Bowl contenders the San Francisco 49ers and the Kansas City Chiefs, have had their social media accounts hacked. To add insult to injury, the NFL’s official account on Twitter was also hijacked, which isn’t the first time this has happened. A hacker collective that calls itself OurMine has claimed responsibility for the incidents.

All the account takeover attacks appear to have taken place over the span of a few hours on Monday. According to the group’s tweets, they were able to hijack the Twitter, Facebook and Instagram accounts of some of the teams. The affected accounts had their profile photos, Twitter header, name and even in some cases, their bio deleted. Many accounts contained some of these now-deleted messages, shared by NFL reporter Dov Kleiman:

Facebook and Twitter provided The Hill with statements, noting that they were investigating the incidents. Another statement by Twitter for Bloomberg elaborates that the hack originated through a third-party platform, although there are no details as to how exactly the attacks unfolded. Currently, all accounts have been restored and bear no signs of the attack.

The timing of these attacks doesn’t seem random and may be seen as a bid to boost the group’s notoriety, as the week leading up to Super Bowl Sunday is one of the most media-heavy weeks.

The collective has hit popular social media accounts before. Their long list of victims includes Spanish soccer teams Real Madrid and FC Barcelona, entertainment giants Netflix and Marvel, as well as tech titans, such as Google CEO Sundar Pichai and Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey.

Generally speaking, account takeover attacks often leverage credential stuffing, an automated method that deploys bots for login attempts. Using stolen or spilled access credentials that belong to one account in order to break into other accounts, the bots will hammer the sites with login attempts until they hit on the right combination.

You can mitigate the chances of having your accounts hacked by using two-factor authentication (2FA) wherever the option is available. Most services offer 2FA as an extra security layer against account hijacking attacks, and Twitter, Facebook and Instagram offer several 2FA methods. It’s always worth doubling down on your security and enable the option on your accounts – our recent article explains the ins and outs of 2FA in greater detail.



Amer Owaida


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Hackers blitz social media accounts of 15 NFL teams – 10 minute mail

The league and scores of teams were caught off-guard by the re-emergence of an infamous hacking group

Fifteen National Football League (NFL) teams, including this year’s Super Bowl contenders the San Francisco 49ers and Kansas City Chiefs, have had their social media accounts hacked. To add insult to injury, the NFL’s official account on Twitter was also hijacked, which isn’t the first time this has happened. A hacker collective that calls itself OurMine has claimed responsibility for the incidents.

All the account takeover attacks appear to have taken place over the span of a few hours on Monday. According to the group’s tweets, they were able to hijack the Twitter, Facebook and Instagram accounts of some of the teams. The affected accounts had their profile photos, Twitter header, name and even in some cases, their bio deleted. Many accounts contained some of these now-deleted messages, shared by NFL reporter Dov Kleiman:

Facebook and Twitter provided The Hill with statements, noting that they were investigating the incidents. Another statement by Twitter for Bloomberg elaborates that the hack originated through a third-party platform, although there are no details as to how exactly the attacks unfolded. Currently, all accounts have been restored and bear no signs of the attack.

The timing of these attacks doesn’t seem random and may be seen as a bid to boost the group’s notoriety, as the week leading up to Super Bowl Sunday is one of the most media-heavy weeks.

The collective has hit popular social media accounts before. Their long list of victims includes Spanish soccer teams Real Madrid and FC Barcelona, entertainment giants Netflix and Marvel, as well as tech titans, such as Google CEO Sundar Pichai and Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey.

Account takeover attacks often leverage credential stuffing, an automated method that deploys bots for login attempts. Using stolen or spilled access credentials that belong to one account in order to break into other accounts, the bots will hammer the sites with login attempts until they hit on the right combination.

You can mitigate the chances of having your accounts hacked by using two-factor authentication (2FA) wherever the option is available. Most services offer 2FA as an extra security layer against exactly the types of attacks the NFL and its teams suffered. Twitter, Facebook and Instagram offer several 2FA methods. If you have the sudden urge to double down on your security and enable the option on your accounts, you can refer to our recent article that explains the ins and outs of 2FA.



Amer Owaida


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