Judge Dismisses ‘Servant’ Copyright Lawsuit Against Apple and M. Night Shyamalan

A lawsuit that accused Apple and M. Night Shyamalan of copying 2013 film “The Truth About Emanuel” for the “Servant” Apple TV+ series has been dismissed, reports Variety.


A federal judge today threw out the copyright lawsuit, which had been levied against Apple and Shyamalan by director Francesca Gregorini, who claimed that “Servant” appropriated the plot of her movie and used the same “cinematic language,” resulting in a “substantially similar feeling, mood, and theme.”

Gregorini also claimed that Servant featured “strikingly similar-and highly idiosyncratic-characters, scenes, directorial choices, and modes of storytelling.”


Released in 2013, “The Truth About Emanuel” told the story of a 17-year old babysitter looking after a doll that’s a replacement for a baby that died, which is also a plot point used in “Servant.” The judge ultimately decided that the TV show is not similar enough to the film to merit a lawsuit, and that Gregorini overstated the similarities between the two works.

“In sum, the alleged similarities between the works pale in comparison to the differences in the plot, themes, dialogue, mood, setting, pace, characters, and sequence of events, and the Court concludes that the works at issue are not substantially similar as a matter of law,” reads the ruling.

Shyamalan and “Servant” show creators have said that “Servant” was in development prior to the release of “The Truth About Emanuel.” Gregorini was aiming for unspecified damages profits Apple made from the show, and an injunction to prevent “Servant” from being further distributed.

“Servant” wrapped up its first season earlier this year and has already been renewed for a second season.

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Brazilian Electronics Company Revives Long-Running iPhone Trademark Dispute

Apple has been involved in a long-running iPhone trademark dispute in Brazil, which was revived today by IGB Electronica, a Brazilian consumer electronics company that originally registered the “‌iPhone‌” name in 2000.


IGB Electronica fought a multi-year battle with Apple in an attempt to get exclusive rights to the “‌iPhone‌” trademark, but ultimately lost, and now the case has been brought to the Supreme Federal Court in Brazil, according to Brazilian site Tecnoblog (via Reddit).

IGB Electronica under the name Gradiente produced a line of IPHONE-branded Android smartphones in Brazil in 2012, and there was a period of time where the Brazilian company was given exclusive rights to the ‌iPhone‌ trademark. That ruling didn’t last, though, and Apple and IGB ultimately both wound up with rights to use the name in the country.

Apple has sought to prevent IGB from using the trademark, while IGB has been attempting to regain its exclusive access to the branding. A decision in 2018 upheld a 2013 ruling that gave both brands permission to use the trademark.

With the most recent lawsuit, IGB is aiming to reverse that 2018 decision, but the case could take years to get a ruling from the Supreme Federal Court in the country. IGB has been in judicial recovery since 2018 and has lost close to 1 billion Brazilian Reals, so the company may be hoping for a payout from Apple to end the dispute.

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Apple Faces Class Action Lawsuit Over ‘Flexgate’ Issue With MacBook Pro Displays

A nationwide class action lawsuit filed against Apple in Northern California court this week accuses the company of knowingly concealing a defect with a display-related flex cable on recent 13-inch and 15-inch MacBook Pro models.


As discovered by repair website iFixit last year, some MacBook Pro models released in 2016 and 2017 have experienced issues with uneven backlighting caused by a delicate flex cable that can wear out and break after repeated opening and closing of the display. Impacted notebooks can exhibit uneven lighting at the bottom of the screen, which has been described as a “stage light” effect, and the backlighting system can eventually fail entirely.

Since the issue often takes time to manifest, the affected ‌MacBook Pro‌ units can be outside of Apple’s one-year warranty period when they start exhibiting symptoms, resulting in an out-of-warranty repair fee of up to $850.

“Imagine spending more than $2,500 on a laptop only for it to fail shortly after the manufacturer’s warranty expires,” said PARRIS Law Firm attorney R. Rex Parris. “What’s even more appalling is Apple requiring customers to spend an additional $600 to $850 to replace the screen.”

Apple seemingly fixed the issue by extending the length of the flex cable by 2mm in the 2018 MacBook Pro. It also launched a free repair program in May 2019, but the program only applies to 13-inch MacBook Pro models released in 2016.

iFixit found the 2018 MacBook Pro flex cable on the left to be 2mm longer

The class action lawsuit seeks restitution for all costs attributable to replacing or replacing the affected MacBook Pro units, and calls for Apple to expand its repair program to cover the 15-inch MacBook Pro. The proposed class is defined as all persons within the United States who purchased a 2016 or newer MacBook Pro.

Related Guide: “Flexgate” Display Issues Affecting 2016 MacBook Pro and Later

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Security Researchers Afraid to Use iPhone Virtualization Corellium After Apple Lawsuit

Security researchers are scared to use, buy, or even talk about iPhone emulation software Corellium after Apple levied a lawsuit against the company, reports Motherboard.


Apple in August 2019 filed a copyright infringement lawsuit against Corellium, a mobile device virtualization company that works with iOS. In the lawsuit, Apple claimed that Corellium had illegally replicated the operating system and apps that run on the ‌iPhone‌ and the iPad.

“Corellium has simply copied everything: the code, the graphical user interface, the icons – all of it, in exacting detail,” reads Apple’s lawsuit.

Corellium initially responded by suggesting that its software helps Apple by making it easier for security researchers to track down iOS bugs, but later said that Apple was waging war on jailbreaking and that the lawsuit should concern security researchers, jailbreakers, and app developers.

Though the legal battle between Apple and Corellium is ongoing, it has successfully scared people away from Corellium’s software because Apple has sought information from companies that have used Corellium’s software and those companies are afraid of retribution.

“Apple has created a chilling effect,” a security researcher familiar with Corellium’s product, who asked to remain anonymous because he wasn’t allowed to talk to the press, told Motherboard.

“I don’t know if they intended it but when they name individuals at companies that have spoken in favor [of Corellium], I definitely believe retribution is possible,” the researcher added, referring to Apple’s subpoena to the Spanish finance giant Santander Bank, which named an employee who had Tweeted about Corellium.

Some security researchers told Motherboard that they’re afraid to use Corellium because of the possibility of retribution from Apple, while others refused to comment at all. One security researcher said he’d have a legal look into it if he needed Corellium’s software, while another said he’d get legal advice before using it in the future.

Not all security researchers, however, are worried. One researcher, Elias Naur, told Motherboard that he uses Corellium to test code written in the Go language for iOS devices. With Corellium, he no longer needs to test on two old and broken iPhones.

Security researchers have complained that Apple’s lawsuit against Corellium is about Apple wanting control over research done on iOS and the bugs that are found.

Apple is continuing to pursue the lawsuit, and on April 20, asked Chris Wade, Corellium’s founder, for all documents and communications related to him obtaining valuable dev-fused or prototype iPhones, which are designed for internal testing but sometimes escape Apple’s clutches. Wade has denied using dev-fused iPhones for the development of Corellium.

It remains unclear how the lawsuit will ultimately turn out, but Apple is successfully making researchers think twice about using Corellium’s tools amid the legal dispute.

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Apple to Pay $18 Million to Settle California Lawsuit Claiming Apple ‘Broke’ FaceTime on Older iPhones to Save Costs

Apple has agreed to pay $18 million to settle a California class-action lawsuit that accused it of intentionally breaking FaceTime in iOS 6 to force users to upgrade to iOS 7.


According to the lawsuit, originally filed in 2017, Apple forced users to upgrade so it could avoid payments on a data deal with Akamai.

Apple used two connection methods when it launched ‌‌FaceTime‌‌ in 2010: a peer-to-peer method that created a direct connection between two iPhones, and a relay method that used data servers from content delivery network company Akamai Technologies.

Apple’s peer-to-peer ‌‌FaceTime‌‌ technology was found to infringe on VirnetX’s patents in 2012, however, so the company began to shift toward the relay method, which used Akamai’s servers. Within a year, Apple was paying $50 million in fees to Akamai, according to testimony from the VirnetX trial.

Apple eventually solved the problem by creating new peer-to-peer technology that would debut in iOS 7. The class-action lawsuits, however, alleged that Apple created a fake bug that caused a digital certificate to prematurely expire on April 16, 2014, breaking ‌‌FaceTime‌‌ on iOS 6.

The lawsuit claimed that breaking ‌‌FaceTime‌‌ in iOS 6 allowed Apple to save money because it would no longer need to support users who did not upgrade to iOS 7.

According to Law360.com, Apple agreed to settle the case with the $18 million payout, although the majority of the money will go to paying attorney fees and expenses, with only a fraction going to the class action’s representatives and claimants.

A court in Florida dismissed a similar consumer lawsuit earlier this year alleging Apple broke ‌FaceTime‌ on older iPhones to save costs.

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Florida Court Dismisses Lawsuit Claiming Apple ‘Broke’ FaceTime on Older iPhones to Save Costs

A court in Florida has dismissed a consumer lawsuit alleging that Apple intentionally “broke” FaceTime on older iPhones as a cost-saving measure (via Bloomberg Law).


In 2017, a similar class-action lawsuit was brought against Apple in California that claimed Apple broke ‌FaceTime‌ in iOS 6 to force users to upgrade to iOS 7. According to the lawsuit, Apple forced users to upgrade so it could avoid payments on a data deal with Akamai.

Apple agreed in February to settle the lawsuit in California, but the federal court in the Florida case ruled on Tuesday that the claims against Apple did not meet timeliness requirements. According to U.S. District Court Judge Raag Singhal, the complainants had several chances to file suit against Apple, but didn’t lodge their complaint until August 2019.

Apple used two connection methods when it launched ‌FaceTime‌ in 2010: a peer-to-peer method that created a direct connection between two iPhones, and a relay method that used data servers from content delivery network company Akamai Technologies.

Apple’s peer-to-peer ‌FaceTime‌ technology was found to infringe on VirnetX’s patents in 2012, however, so the company began to shift toward the relay method, which used Akamai’s servers. Within a year, Apple was paying $50 million in fees to Akamai, according to testimony from the VirnetX trial.

Apple eventually solved the problem by creating new peer-to-peer technology that would debut in iOS 7. The class-action lawsuits, however, alleged that Apple created a fake bug that caused a digital certificate to prematurely expire on April 16, 2014, breaking ‌FaceTime‌ on iOS 6.

The lawsuits claimed that breaking ‌FaceTime‌ in iOS 6 allowed Apple to save money because it would no longer need to support users who did not upgrade to iOS 7.

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